South Carolina is known for its shoreline of subtropical beaches and marsh-like sea islands. The abundance of natural beauty is a motorcyclist’s paradise.  So whether you are passing through the Palmetto State on two wheels or you have just taken up residence, here are some things you should know.

South Carolina Motorcycle Insurance Requirements

The South Carolina Law requires of you to carry insurance whenever you ride your motorcycle on the state roads. In South Carolina the required amounts of liability insurance are as follows:

$25,000―per person for bodily injury

 

$50,000―per accident for bodily injury

$25,000―per accident for property damage

While it is mandated by the state to carry liability insurance, you should also add physical damage

motorcycle ins

coverage as well as uninsured/underinsured motorist and medical payments to your policy.   Physical damage is also known as comprehensive, and collision will provide coverage if your bike is stolen or damaged by hail. Read more about other coverages on a motorcycle policy here.

South Carolina Motorcycle Stats

South Carolina is considered one of the most dangerous states for motorcyclists. There were 135 motorcyclist deaths on South Carolina roads in 2016. While insurance can protect you financially, you should always wear a helmet.  Approximately three-quarters of motorcycle riders who died on roads in South Carolina over the past ten years did not have on a helmet at the time of their crash. While there other contributors such as unsafe roads and distracted driving, deaths related to no helmets can be prevented.

Follow these pointers for safe riding:

Wear a helmet. Never ride without a helmet with a face shield or protective eyewear. Using a helmet is the only way to protect against critical head injuries. A motorcyclist not wearing headgear is five times more likely to suffer from a severe head injury.

Wear proper apparel. Make sure to wear gear and clothing that will protect and minimize the number of injuries caused by an accident or a skid. Protective gear includes wearing leather clothing, boots with nonskid soles, and gloves. You may also consider adding reflective tape to your jacket to make it easier for other drivers to see you.

insurance for motorcyclesObserve traffic rules. Follow the speed limit; remember the faster you go, the harder it is to stop. Know the local traffic laws and rules of the road.

Ride Carefully. Never assume other drivers can see you, as nearly 60 percent of all motorcycle accidents occur when other drivers do not yield the right of way to riders. Keep your headlights on; avoid other driver’s blind spots; use signals well before any change in direction, and keep an eye out for vehicles that are turning.

Keep your riding skills sharpened with education. Take a formal riding education program, get licensed and take additional riding courses when possible to promote excellent riding techniques.

Stay awake and ride sober.  Never drink and ride; it is illegal, and you could cause harm to yourself or others. Fatigue and drowsiness also impair your ability to react, be sure that you are well rested when you hit the road.

Planning To Ride

Prepping your motorcycle for the road is just as important as practicing safe riding and maintaining insurance coverage. Should something be wrong with your bike, it will be in your best interest to find out before hitting the road. Here are some checks you can perform to ensure that your bike is in good working order:

  • Tires: Look for any cracks or bulges, or other signs of wear in the treads (blowouts are the result of low tire pressure and other anomalies)
  • Under the motorcycle: Check for oil or gas leaks
  • Headlight, taillight, and signals: Make sure that all lights are functioning and test for high and low beams
  • Hydraulic and Coolant fluids: Ideally, levels should be checked weekly
  • Once you are on the motorcycle, complete the following checks:
  • Clutch and throttle: Check that they are working smoothly
  • Mirrors: Clean and adjust all mirrors to ensure the best viewing
  • Brakes: Test front and rear brakes for firmness and hold the motorcycle still when fully applied
  • Horn: Test the horn

motorcycle south carolinaNow that you have the proper motorcycle insurance knowledge and the best safety tips get out there and try some of these fantastic scenic adventures.

 

 

1. Sumter National Forest- Short Loop

Distance: 81.6 miles

2. Junction to Junction Loop

Distance: 86.4 miles

3. Lake Moultrie Loop

Distance: 96 miles

4. Great Falls to Camden (SR97)

Distance 34.1 miles

5. Savannah River Scenic Byway

Distance 112 miles

6. Ride for Kids: Greenville IMS Twisties

Distance: 86 miles

7. Ride for Kids: Greenville IMS Pickens Loop

Distance: 96 miles

8. Ride for Kids: Greenville IMS Brevard Route

Distance: 99 miles

9. Ride for Kids: Greenville IMS Brevard-BRP

Distance: 168 miles

10. Road2ACure: Walterborough, SC to Louisville KY

Distance: 728.7 miles

11. Huger Loop

Distance: 94 miles

For all things insurance give us a call (888) 445-2793 or send us an email!